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American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

Dietary Emulsifier–Induced Low-Grade Inflammation Promotes Colon Carcinogenesis

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 15,764)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
121 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
178 tweeters
facebook
13 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
96 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
138 Mendeley
Title
Dietary Emulsifier–Induced Low-Grade Inflammation Promotes Colon Carcinogenesis
Published in
Cancer Research, November 2016
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-16-1359
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emilie Viennois, Didier Merlin, Andrew T. Gewirtz, Benoit Chassaing

Abstract

The increased risks conferred by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) gave rise to the term "colitis-associated cancer" and the concept that inflammation promotes colon tumorigenesis. A condition more common than IBD is low-grade inflammation, which correlates with altered gut microbiota composition and metabolic syndrome, both present in many cases of CRC. Recent findings suggest that low-grade inflammation in the intestine is promoted by consumption of dietary emulsifiers, a ubiquitous component of processed foods which alter the composition of gut microbiota. Here, we demonstrate in a pre-clinical model of colitis-induced CRC that regular consumption of dietary emulsifiers carboxymethylcellulose or polysorbate-80 exacerbated tumor development. Enhanced tumor development was associated with an altered microbiota metagenome characterized by elevated levels of lipopolysaccharide and flagellin. We found that emulsifier-induced alterations in the microbiome were necessary and sufficient to drive alterations in major proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways thought to govern tumor development. Overall, our findings support the concept that perturbations in host-microbiota interactions that cause low-grade gut inflammation can promote colon carcinogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 178 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 137 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 18%
Student > Master 20 14%
Student > Bachelor 17 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 11%
Other 11 8%
Other 25 18%
Unknown 25 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 5%
Chemistry 5 4%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 30 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1091. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2021.
All research outputs
#7,457
of 18,422,743 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#1
of 15,764 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#215
of 302,729 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#1
of 181 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,422,743 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15,764 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,729 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 181 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.