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American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

Meat and Meat-Mutagen Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Cohort

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, December 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
95 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Meat and Meat-Mutagen Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Cohort
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, December 2007
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-07-0378
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. Z. Stolzenberg-Solomon, A. J. Cross, D. T. Silverman, C. Schairer, F. E. Thompson, V. Kipnis, A. F. Subar, A. Hollenbeck, A. Schatzkin, R. Sinha

Abstract

Meat intake, particularly red meat, has been positively associated with pancreatic cancer in some epidemiologic studies. Detailed meat-cooking methods and related mutagens formed in meat cooked at high temperatures have not been evaluated prospectively as risk factors for this malignancy. We investigated the association between meat, meat-cooking methods, meat-mutagen intake, and exocrine pancreatic cancer in the NIH-American Association of Retired Persons (NIH-AARP) Diet and Health Study cohort of 537,302 individuals, aged 50 to 71 years, with complete baseline dietary data (1995-1996) ascertained from a food frequency questionnaire. A meat-cooking module was completed by 332,913 individuals 6 months after baseline. During 5 years of follow-up, 836 incident pancreatic cancer cases (555 men, 281 women) were identified. Four hundred and fifty-nine cases had complete meat module data. We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Total, red, and high-temperature cooked meat intake was positively associated with pancreatic cancer among men (fifth versus first quintile: HR, 1.41, 95% CI, 1.08-1.83, P trend = 0.001; HR, 1.42, 95% CI, 1.05-1.91, P trend = 0.01; and HR, 1.52, 95% CI, 1.12-2.06, P trend = 0.005, respectively), but not women. Men showed significant 50% increased risks for the highest tertile of grilled/barbecued and broiled meat and significant doubling of risk for the highest quintile of overall meat-mutagenic activity (P trends < 0.01). The fifth quintile of the heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline intake showed a significant 29% (P trend = 0.006) increased risk in men and women combined. These findings support the hypothesis that meat intake, particularly meat cooked at high temperatures and associated mutagens, may play a role in pancreatic cancer development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 77 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Researcher 9 11%
Other 7 9%
Other 17 22%
Unknown 12 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 13%
Chemistry 3 4%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 12 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 65. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2021.
All research outputs
#390,918
of 17,351,915 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#168
of 3,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,735
of 166,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#3
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,351,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,935 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 166,096 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.