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American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

Weight Cycling and Cancer: Weighing the Evidence of Intermittent Caloric Restriction and Cancer Risk

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Prevention Research, October 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Weight Cycling and Cancer: Weighing the Evidence of Intermittent Caloric Restriction and Cancer Risk
Published in
Cancer Prevention Research, October 2011
DOI 10.1158/1940-6207.capr-11-0133
Pubmed ID
Authors

Henry J. Thompson, Anne McTiernan

Abstract

Overweight and obese individuals frequently restrict caloric intake to lose weight. The resultant weight loss, however, typically is followed by an equal or greater weight gain, a phenomenon called weight cycling. Most attention to weight cycling has focused on identifying its detrimental effects, but preclinical experiments indicating that intermittent caloric restriction or fasting can reduce cancer risk have raised interest in potential benefits of weight cycling. Although hypothesized adverse effects of weight cycling on energy metabolism remain largely unsubstantiated, there is also a lack of epidemiologic evidence that intentional weight loss followed by regain of weight affects chronic-disease risk. In the limited studies of weight cycling and cancer, no independent effect on postmenopausal breast cancer but a modest enhancement of risk for renal cell carcinoma, endometrial cancer, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma have been reported. An effect of either intermittent caloric restriction or fasting in protecting against cancer is not supported by the majority of rodent carcinogenesis experiments. Collectively, the data argue against weight cycling and indicate that the objective of energy balance-based approaches to reduce cancer risk should be to strive to prevent adult weight gain and maintain body weight within the normal range defined by body mass index.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 3%
Denmark 1 1%
France 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 69 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 23%
Student > Master 12 16%
Other 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 12%
Psychology 5 7%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 10 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2021.
All research outputs
#2,058,145
of 19,503,523 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Prevention Research
#218
of 1,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,467
of 116,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Prevention Research
#7
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,503,523 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,244 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 116,356 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.