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American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 3,895)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
70 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
460 tweeters
facebook
27 Facebook pages
googleplus
6 Google+ users
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
Title
Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, March 2016
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-15-0924
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie L. Schmit, Hedy S. Rennert, Gad Rennert, Stephen B. Gruber

Abstract

Coffee contains several bioactive compounds relevant to colon physiology. Although coffee intake is a proposed protective factor for colorectal cancer, current evidence remains inconclusive. We investigated the association between coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in 5,145 cases and 4,097 controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (MECC) study, a population-based case-control study in northern Israel. We also examined this association by type of coffee, by cancer site (colon and rectum), and by ethnic subgroup (Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, and Arabs). Coffee data were collected by interview using a validated, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coffee consumption was associated with 26% lower odds of developing colorectal cancer [OR (drinkers vs. non-drinkers), 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-0.86; P < 0.001]. The inverse association was also observed for decaffeinated coffee consumption alone (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.99; P = 0.04) and for boiled coffee (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71-0.94; P = 0.004). Increasing consumption of coffee was associated with lower odds of developing colorectal cancer. Compared with <1 serving/day, intake of 1 to <2 servings/day (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.68-0.90; P < 0.001), 2 to 2.5 servings/day (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.51-0.68; P < 0.001), and >2.5 servings/day (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.39-0.54; P < 0.001) were associated with significantly lower odds of colorectal cancer (Ptrend < 0.001), and the dose-response trend was statistically significant for both colon and rectal cancers. Coffee consumption may be inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer in a dose-response manner. Global coffee consumption patterns suggest potential health benefits of the beverage for reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 634-9. ©2016 AACR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 460 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Austria 1 1%
Unknown 95 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 16%
Student > Master 14 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 11%
Other 9 9%
Student > Postgraduate 7 7%
Other 25 26%
Unknown 16 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Chemistry 3 3%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 25 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 891. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2021.
All research outputs
#9,394
of 17,067,437 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#2
of 3,895 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222
of 269,490 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#1
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,067,437 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,895 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,490 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.