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American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

Prevalence and Penetrance of Major Genes and Polygenes for Colorectal Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
52 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
166 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
140 Mendeley
Title
Prevalence and Penetrance of Major Genes and Polygenes for Colorectal Cancer
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, October 2016
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-16-0693
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aung Ko Win, Mark A. Jenkins, James G. Dowty, Antonis C. Antoniou, Andrew Lee, Graham G. Giles, Daniel D. Buchanan, Mark Clendenning, Christophe Rosty, Dennis J. Ahnen, Stephen N. Thibodeau, Graham Casey, Steven Gallinger, Loïc Le Marchand, Robert W. Haile, John D. Potter, Yingye Zheng, Noralane M. Lindor, Polly A. Newcomb, John L. Hopper, Robert J. MacInnis

Abstract

While high-risk mutations in identified major susceptibility genes (DNA mismatch repair genes and MUTYH) account for some familial aggregation of colorectal cancer, their population prevalence and the causes of the remaining familial aggregation are not known. We studied the families of 5,744 colorectal cancer cases (probands) recruited from population cancer registries in the USA, Canada and Australia and screened probands for mutations in mismatch repair genes and MUTYH. We conducted modified segregation analyses using the cancer history of first-degree relatives, conditional on the proband's age at diagnosis. We estimated the prevalence of mutations in the identified genes, the prevalence of and hazard ratio for unidentified major gene mutations, and the variance of the residual polygenic component. We estimated that 1 in 279 of the population carry mutations in mismatch repair genes (MLH1= 1 in 1946, MSH2= 1 in 2841, MSH6= 1 in 758, PMS2= 1 in 714), 1 in 45 carry mutations in MUTYH, and 1 in 504 carry mutations associated with an average 31-fold increased risk of colorectal cancer in unidentified major genes. The estimated polygenic variance was reduced by 30-50% after allowing for unidentified major genes and decreased from 3.3 for age <40 years to 0.5 for age {greater than or equal to}70 years (equivalent to sibling relative risks of 5.1 to 1.3, respectively). Unidentified major genes might explain one-third to one-half of the missing heritability of colorectal cancer. Our findings could aid gene discovery and development of better colorectal cancer risk prediction models.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 139 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 17%
Student > Bachelor 23 16%
Student > Master 19 14%
Student > Postgraduate 9 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 6%
Other 29 21%
Unknown 27 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 1%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 37 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 52. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2021.
All research outputs
#540,516
of 18,890,258 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#227
of 4,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,927
of 304,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#6
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,890,258 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,061 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 304,158 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.