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American Association for Cancer Research

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Smoking and Lung Cancer Risk in American and Japanese Men: An International Case-Control Study

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, January 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
83 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
90 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Smoking and Lung Cancer Risk in American and Japanese Men: An International Case-Control Study
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, January 2003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steven D. Stellman, Toshiro Takezaki, Lisa Wang, Yu Chen, Marc L. Citron, Mirjana V. Djordjevic, Susan Harlap, Joshua E. Muscat, Alfred I. Neugut, Ernst L. Wynder, Hiroshi Ogawa, Kazuo Tajima, Kunio Aoki, Stellman, S D, Takezaki, T, Wang, L, Chen, Y, Citron, M L, Djordjevic, M V, Harlap, S, Muscat, J E, Neugut, A I, Wynder, E L, Ogawa, H, Tajima, K, Aoki, K

Abstract

Rates of lung cancer in American men have greatly exceeded those in Japanese men for several decades despite the higher smoking prevalence in Japanese men. It is not known whether the relative risk of lung cancer associated with cigarette smoking is lower in Japanese men than American men and whether these risks vary by the amount and duration of smoking. To estimate smoking-specific relative risks for lung cancer in men, a multicentric case-control study was carried out in New York City, Washington, DC, and Nagoya, Japan from 1992 to 1998. A total of 371 cases and 373 age-matched controls were interviewed in United States hospitals and 410 cases and 252 hospital controls in Japanese hospitals; 411 Japanese age-matched healthy controls were also randomly selected from electoral rolls. The odds ratio (OR) for lung cancer in current United States smokers relative to nonsmokers was 40.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 21.8-79.6], which was >10 times higher than the OR of 3.5 for current smokers in Japanese relative to hospital controls (95% CI = 1.6-7.5) and six times higher than in Japanese relative to community controls (OR = 6.3; 95% CI = 3.7-10.9). There were no substantial differences in the mean number of years of smoking or average daily number of cigarettes smoked between United States and Japanese cases or between United States and Japanese controls, but American cases began smoking on average 2.5 years earlier than Japanese cases. The risk of lung cancer associated with cigarette smoking was substantially higher in United States than in Japanese males, consistent with population-based statistics on smoking prevalence and lung cancer incidence. Possible explanations for this difference in risk include a more toxic cigarette formulation of American manufactured cigarettes as evidenced by higher concentrations of tobacco-specific nitrosamines in both tobacco and mainstream smoke, the much wider use of activated charcoal in the filters of Japanese than in American cigarettes, as well as documented differences in genetic susceptibility and lifestyle factors other than smoking.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 83 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Poland 1 3%
Unknown 30 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 21%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Other 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 9 26%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 86. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2021.
All research outputs
#292,725
of 17,446,661 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#132
of 3,959 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,401
of 162,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#7
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,446,661 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,959 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 162,083 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.