↓ Skip to main content

American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

Longitude Position in a Time Zone and Cancer Risk in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, April 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 3,959)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
66 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
Title
Longitude Position in a Time Zone and Cancer Risk in the United States
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, April 2017
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-16-1029
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fangyi Gu, Shangda Xu, Susan S. Devesa, Fanni Zhang, Elizabeth B. Klerman, Barry I. Graubard, Neil E. Caporaso

Abstract

Circadian disruption is a probable human carcinogen. From the eastern to western border of a timezone, social time is equal whereas solar time is progressively delayed, producing increased discrepancies between individuals' social and biological circadian time. Accordingly, western timezone residents experience greater circadian disruption and may be at an increased risk of cancer. We examine associations between the position in a timezone (PTZ) and age-standardized county-level incidence rates for total cancers combined and 23 specific cancers by gender using the data of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (2000-2012), including four million cancer diagnoses in white residents of 607 counties in 11 US states. Log-linear regression was conducted, adjusting for latitude, poverty, cigarette smoking, and state. Bonferroni corrected p-values were used as the significance criteria. Risk increased from east to west within a timezone for total and many specific cancers, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (both genders) and cancers of the stomach, liver, prostate, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in men and cancers of the esophagus, colorectum, lung, breast, and corpus uteri in women. Risk increased from the east to the westin a timezone for total and many specific cancers, in accord with the circadian disruption hypothesis. Replication in analytic epidemiologic studies are warranted. Our findings suggest that circadian disruption may not be a rare phenomenon affecting only shift workers, but is widespread in the general population with broader implications for public health than generally appreciated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 66 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Professor 5 12%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 11 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 15 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 200. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2021.
All research outputs
#105,419
of 17,468,018 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#46
of 3,959 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,349
of 273,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#5
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,468,018 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,959 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,335 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.