↓ Skip to main content

American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

Lessons from Applied Ecology: Cancer Control Using an Evolutionary Double Bind

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, September 2009
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
26 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
115 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Lessons from Applied Ecology: Cancer Control Using an Evolutionary Double Bind
Published in
Cancer Research, September 2009
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-09-1354
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert A. Gatenby, Joel Brown, Thomas Vincent

Abstract

Because the metastatic cascade is largely governed by the ability of malignant cells to adapt and proliferate at the distant tissue site, we propose that disseminated cancers are analogous in many important ways to the evolutionary and ecological dynamics of exotic species. Although pests can be decimated through the application of chemical toxins, this strategy virtually never achieves robust control as evolution of resistant phenotypes typically permits population recovery to pretreatment levels. In general, biological strategies that introduce predators, parasitoids, or pathogens have achieved more durable control of pest populations even after emergence of resistant phenotypes. From this we propose that long term outcome from any treatment strategy for invasive pests, including cancer, is not limited by evolution of resistance, but rather by the phenotypic cost of that resistance. If a cancerous cell's adaptation to therapy is achieved by upregulating xenobiotic metabolism or a redundant signaling pathway, the required investment in resources is small, and the original malignant phenotype remains essentially intact. As a result, the cancer cells' initial high level of fitness is little changed and unconstrained proliferation will resume once resistance evolves. Robust population control is possible if resistance to therapy requires a substantial and costly phenotypic adaptation that also significantly reduces the organism's fitness in its original niche: an evolutionary double bind.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
United Kingdom 2 2%
France 2 2%
Sweden 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 100 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 29%
Researcher 20 17%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 9%
Professor 8 7%
Other 22 19%
Unknown 10 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 9%
Mathematics 9 8%
Engineering 5 4%
Other 17 15%
Unknown 20 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 219. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2021.
All research outputs
#109,161
of 19,496,717 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#51
of 16,195 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,090
of 201,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#1
of 149 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,496,717 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,195 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,698 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 149 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.