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American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

AGE Metabolites: A Biomarker Linked to Cancer Disparity?

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, July 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
patent
8 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
AGE Metabolites: A Biomarker Linked to Cancer Disparity?
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, July 2014
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-14-0564
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dion Foster, Laura Spruill, Katherine R. Walter, Lourdes M. Nogueira, Hleb Fedarovich, Ryan Y. Turner, Mahtabuddin Ahmed, Judith D. Salley, Marvella E. Ford, Victoria J. Findlay, David P. Turner

Abstract

Socioeconomic and environmental influences are established factors promoting cancer disparity but the contribution of biological factors is not clear. We report a mechanistic link between carbohydrate derived metabolites and cancer which may provide a biological consequence of established factors of cancer disparity. Glycation is the non-enzymatic glycosylation of carbohydrates to macromolecules which produces reactive metabolites called advanced glycation end products (AGEs). A sedentary lifestyle and poor diet all promote disease and the AGE accumulation pool in our bodies and also increase cancer risk. We examined AGE metabolites in clinical specimens of African American and European American prostate cancer patients and found a higher AGE concentration in these specimens among African American patients when compared to European American patients. Elevated AGE levels corresponded with expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE or AGER). We show that AGE mediated increases in cancer associated processes is dependent upon RAGE. Aberrant AGE accumulation may represent a metabolic susceptibility difference that contributes to cancer disparity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 35 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Professor 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 9 24%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 16%
Engineering 3 8%
Chemistry 2 5%
Other 7 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2021.
All research outputs
#2,070,248
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#697
of 3,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,560
of 200,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#16
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,936 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 200,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.