↓ Skip to main content

American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

Cancer Incidence in the U.S. Military Population: Comparison with Rates from the SEER Program

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, June 2009
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 3,988)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
67 news outlets
twitter
13 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
56 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
123 Mendeley
Title
Cancer Incidence in the U.S. Military Population: Comparison with Rates from the SEER Program
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, June 2009
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-09-0041
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kangmin Zhu, Susan S. Devesa, Hongyu Wu, Shelia Hoar Zahm, Ismail Jatoi, William F. Anderson, George E. Peoples, Larry G. Maxwell, Elder Granger, John F. Potter, Katherine A. McGlynn

Abstract

The U.S. active-duty military population may differ from the U.S. general population in its exposure to cancer risk factors and access to medical care. Yet, it is not known if cancer incidence rates differ between these two populations. We therefore compared the incidence of four cancers common in U.S. adults (lung, colorectal, prostate, and breast cancers) and two cancers more common in U.S. young adults (testicular and cervical cancers) in the military and general populations. Data from the Automated Central Tumor Registry (ACTUR) of the Department of Defense and the nine cancer registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) of the National Cancer Institute for the years 1990 to 2004 for persons with ages 20 to 59 years were analyzed. Incidence rates were significantly lower in the military population for colorectal cancer in White men, lung cancer in White and Black men and White women, and cervical cancer in Black women. In contrast, incidence rates of breast and prostate cancers were significantly higher in the military among Whites and Blacks. Incidence rates of testicular cancer did not differ between ACTUR and SEER. Although the numbers of diagnoses among military personnel were relatively small for temporal trend analysis, we found a more prominent increase in prostate cancer in ACTUR than in SEER. Overall, these results suggest that cancer patterns may differ between military and nonmilitary populations. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore contributing factors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 119 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 18%
Other 20 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 7%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Other 23 19%
Unknown 13 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 12%
Engineering 9 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 5%
Other 37 30%
Unknown 20 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 530. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2021.
All research outputs
#25,754
of 17,994,434 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#16
of 3,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73
of 131,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#1
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,994,434 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,988 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 131,813 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.