↓ Skip to main content

American Association for Cancer Research

Article Metrics

Tea intake and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin: influence of type of tea beverages.

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, July 2000
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
Title
Tea intake and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin: influence of type of tea beverages.
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, July 2000
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hakim, I A, Harris, R B, Weisgerber, U M, Iman A. Hakim, Robin B. Harris, Ute M. Weisgerber

Abstract

Differences in tea drinking habits are likely to vary by populations and could contribute to the inconsistencies found between studies comparing tea consumption and cancer risk. A population-based case-control study was used to evaluate how usual tea consumption patterns of an older population (n = 450) varied with history of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. A detailed tea questionnaire was developed to assess specific tea preparation methods and patterns of drinking. In this southwestern United States population, black tea was the predominant variety of tea consumed. We found no association between the broad definition of any tea consumption and skin SCC. However, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for hot and iced black tea intake were 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.36-1.10] and 1.02 (95% CI, 0.64-1.63), respectively. Controls were more likely to report usually drinking strong hot tea (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.53-1.03) with increased brewing time (P for trend = 0.03). Adjusting for brewing time, the association between skin SCC and hot black tea consumption suggests a significantly lower risk in consumers of hot tea compared to nonconsumers (OR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.87). This is one of the first studies to explore the relation between different types of tea consumption and occurrence of human cancers. Our results show that tea concentration (strength), brewing time, and beverage temperature have major influences on the potential protective effects of hot black tea in relation to skin SCC. Further studies with increased sample sizes are needed to evaluate the interrelationships between preparation techniques, tea type, and other life-style factors.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 28%
Researcher 3 17%
Student > Master 2 11%
Unspecified 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 4 22%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Psychology 1 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Other 4 22%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 73. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2021.
All research outputs
#334,970
of 17,020,562 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#145
of 3,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,894
of 267,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#1
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,020,562 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,885 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,223 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.